The Best Romantic Korean Dramas

If you are looking for suggestions of Korean dramas to watch, you’ve come to the right place.

Below you’ll find a list of currently more than 30 reviews of the best romantic Korean dramas. What do I mean by romantic K-dramas? Basically, all shows that are clearly not melodramas, historicals, thrillers, fantasy and action shows. Romantic K-dramas often include aspects of these genres – in the end, though, they are mainly about the couple-to-be and have an at least somewhat happy ending.Lie to Me kissing
Before diving into the reviews, you might want to take a look at the FAQ page – especially if you are new to K-drama. That’s where I talk about some practical issues (from streaming sites to the danger of Wikipedia reviews) and also delve into some general topics, for example why Korean dramas are so great.

The reviews are listed chronologically. Instead of detailed ratings, I labeled the dramas simply as either “good” or “excellent.” Once in a while I also mention a good drama from another genre if it includes at least a little romance. However, those few are clearly marked with a “Genre alert!” warning.

The most recent batch of romantic K-dramas has been more angsty and edgy, making it harder to find good rom-com fun. So I’ve started to add a few rom-coms from other Asian countries, just to give you more options.

What would a great romantic drama be without great romantic music? Even reading about romantic dramas is more fun with the right background music. So I’ve interspersed a few music videos among the reviews. While it’s great to listen to Korean ballads, sometimes I’m more in the mood for upbeat love songs whose lyrics I can actually understand. So the videos come in two flavors: ballads (in Korean) and pop songs (in English). The ballads are hits from the soundtracks of K-dramas; for the upbeat songs I’ve tried to uncover some gems from YouTube. If you’re visiting this site on a mobile device make sure you activate your background function.

BALLAD (IN KOREAN)

That Woman
Baek Ji Young

POP SONG (IN ENGLISH)

Summer Days Are Back Again
Nathaniel Be West Band

2016
Far Away Love, photo, main page
Far Away Love
Do you particularly love the classics when it comes to K-rom-coms? Then I’ll bet you’ll like this drama. It’s a Chinese production, released in 2016, but has the feel of favorite shows like Secret Garden (2010) or Lie to Me (2011).
Right away, we have a similar set-up – a son of a wealthy family fighting with his mother about a woman not to her liking. In Far Away Love, it goes like this: Straight-laced and emotionally numb rich-guy Shen An, a CEO of a food conglomerate, keeps having run-ins (and later gets entangled) with Meng Chu Xia (played by Li Fei Er), a clumsy, soft-hearted but stubborn 28-year-old who’s raising her nephew by herself. Korean actor Park Hae Jin (My Love from the Star and Cheese in the Trap) plays the male lead, which enhances even more the Korean rom-com-feeling. But, most important, this drama has the same tone and similar structure as those archetypal K-rom-coms: Lots of funny, cute and screwball-ish parts in the first half of the series, while later episodes add emotional depth and drama. Plus an excellent ending.
On the downside, we have a truly cringeworthy song in Italian and a few slips into too-obvious soap opera territory – but that only marginally mars an otherwise excellent show. As I’ve noticed with other Chinese dramas, the beginning of each episode previews too much of the plot – to remedy, just skip the first minute and 40 seconds.
Excellent (minus).
(For a more detailed version of this review, go here.)
Southeast and Guangdong TV (China). Written by Mi Tian Hui.
promo photo for My Amazing Boyfriend
My Amazing Boyfriend
A hilarious rom-com action fantasy about an unlucky actress, Tian Jing Zhi (played by Wu Qian), who awakens a mysterious 400-year old man with superpowers. Bound to Jing Zhi by blood ties, he moves in with the initially unwilling, rather volatile and very expressive young woman, looking for his mortal enemy.
Wait a moment … an actress and a mysterious being with superpowers? Doesn’t this sound familiar? Yes, this is the Chinese drama “inspired” by My Love from the Star and the looks of the male lead, Korean model Kim Tae Hwan, won’t let you easily forget it. But no worries: Even though there are some similarities, this is clearly not a remake. In fact, it is fun to see how the writer comes up with a different story, given the similar premise. The drama is also slightly different in tone – more crazy over-the-top comedy chunks (balanced by some serious action/thriller aspects) and less heart-wrenching melo parts.
What I really want to say is this: This drama can completely hold its own and the sooner you abandon any comparisons to MLFTS, the more fun you have watching it. One drawback, though, is the change of its tone and focus two-thirds of the way in from a roughly even mix of rom-com and thriller with a touch of melo vibe to mostly thriller. Some people might like that. Me – not so much. And watch out: The episodes’ intro section (about a minute and a half long) gives away too much, so I highly recommend skipping it.
Excellent (first 2/3), good (last 1/3).
(For a more detailed version of this review, go here.)
MGTV (China). Written by Shui Qian-Mo.
2015
2015_Healer
Healer
Genre alert! It’s a thriller, yes. But there’s also a strong romance aspect and even a little bit of humor in this story about a mysterious errand boy (Ji Chang Wook) called “Healer” who operates in the shady underworld of Seoul. He gets too involved in one of his cases and connects with a news reporter, played by Park Min Young (Sungkyunkwan Scandal).
Well done and entertaining. If you don’t mind the customary fighting and killing, give it a shot (Ha!).
KBS. Written by Song Ji Na. 2014-2015
2015_Hogu's Love
Hogu’s Love
This one is a little different. There is clearly an educational and emancipatory intent here, packaged in an entertaining and engaging drama. It covers topics that are rarely openly discussed in Korean dramas, like homosexuality, pregnancy, and single mothers – but also, of course, the more typical themes like dating and romantic love. All is done in a sensitive and tasteful manner so it’s hard to imagine anybody would feel offended. Our hero is a sweet, dreamy guy (perfect role for Choi Woo Shik) on a quest to win over the ambitious, tough but also vulnerable heroine (Uee), a world class swimmer.
The drama just feels fresh and very contemporary. Minor downsides are the songs – there are basically none that I can remember, so no great OST (Original Soundtrack). And some scenes in the first episodes are plainly annoying (or very silly, depending on your taste) but hang in there, it keeps getting better. Excellent.
tvN. Written by Yoon Nan Joong.
2015_Pinocchio
Pinocchio
I love it when dramas address current social or political issues. Like in this one. Park Shin Hye (You’re Beautiful, Flower Boys Next Door) and Lee Jong Suk play two apprentice reporters for a big news show. We learn a lot about how news is produced and manipulated and how political pressure is applied. Of course, this story is fictional but I wouldn’t be surprised if the world it creates bears a strong resemblance to reality. Not that anybody should think that this is a dry educational documentary – not at all: It’s entertaining with an interesting story and a romance that works well. Park Shin Hye’s Pinocchio syndrome (she can’t lie without hiccups) adds a cute touch. Don’t be too shocked by the melodramatic first episode. It’s pretty harsh – but no worries, the rest is rom-com fine. My favorite Park Shin Hye drama. Excellent.
SBS. Written by Park Hye Ryun. 2014-15
2014
my-love-from-the-star-big-6
My Love from the Star
If you want to experience the best in Korean dramas, there are only two you have to watch – Secret Garden and this one. It’s as close to perfection as you can get – from the high production values, the mixing of genres (sf, thriller, comedy, a touch of melodrama but underlying all is, of course, romance), the excellent writing and surprising plot changes, the wide array of supporting characters with well-chosen actors and a satisfying ending. But it is of course the fantastic performances of Korean superstar Jun Ji Hyun and hero Kim Soo Hyun that make this drama about an alien lost on Earth truly outstanding. Immensely entertaining but also moving. Simply an amazing achievement. Excellent.
SBS. Written by Park Ji-eun. 2013-2014
2014_you're all surrounded
You’re all Surrounded
Genre alert! Basically a good police show with a bit of romance. The suspenseful crime scenarios mixed with some funny scenes give this drama an unusually varied tone. Great actors, too. Hero Lee Seung Gi is a rookie detective, secretly trying to find the murderer of his mother; Go Ara plays his colleague and love interest. If the crime stuff doesn’t bother you, give it a try.
SBS. Written by Lee Jung Sun.
2013
2013 Flower Boy Next Door
Flower Boys Next Door
If you’ve had your fill of all the oh-so spunky heroines who never seem to run out of energy, then this drama might be right for you. The character played by Park Shin Hye is a rare find in the rom-com world: a quiet, slightly depressed freelance copy editor who likes to stay in the safety of her apartment. Romance still finds her, though. Two handsome guys are interested in her but meanwhile she is focused on her neighbor across the street. The mystery of the heroine’s personality is the drama’s strong point. Unfortunately, the story starts to fizzle out after two thirds of the way. And while Yoon Shi Yoon (The Prime Minister and I) is cute, his bubbly hero can be slightly annoying. Good.
tvN. Written by Kim Eun Jung.
2013 Nine_Time_Travels
Nine: Nine Time Travels
Genre alert! A complex and suspenseful time travel thriller. Lee Jin Wook plays an anchorman at a TV station who has nine chances to travel back in time to solve a murder mystery that happened 20 years before. But he learns quickly that undoing events in the past keeps creating new problems in the present. While the set-up is intriguing, it gets rather complicated towards the end. Good.
tvN. Written by Song Jae Jung and Kim Yoon Joo.
2013 The Prime Minister and I
The Prime Minister and I
A strong start but a weak finish. By accident, a tabloid journalist (Im Yoona) gets very much involved with Korea’s prime minister, a 42-year old widower. A fun idea with a promising execution in the beginning – but then it peters out in the last third with boring scenes, lack of creative ideas and too much singing. And a lame ending. Still: Nothing upsetting and enjoyable for most of it – just keep forwarding through the boring parts. And the drama redeemed Im Yoona in the rom-com world after the disastrous Cinderella Man. Excellent (first two thirds) / Boring (last third) = Good.
KBS. Written by Kim Eun Hee and Yoon Eun Kyung. 2013-2014
2012
2012 Queen In-hyun's Man
Queen In Hyun’s Man
A time-traveling scholar (Ji Hyun Woo) from the 17th century meets an actress (Yoo In Na) in contemporary Seoul. Another genre-mix of historical and modern drama similar to Rooftop Prince or My Love from Another Star. One big difference is that our hero keeps moving back and forth between his time and the present, so the historical segments occupy almost as much time as the modern romance.
A pleasure to watch all around. The story moves along nicely, the tone is pitch perfect, the switch between the different times adds another layer of complexity and Yoo In Na gets finally a well-deserved leading role. The kind, humorous and smart hero is a refreshing change from the numerous arrogant leads who drag the heroine wrist-gripped behind them. Considering the anti-intellectualism of Western TV, it’s always nice to see that in the Korean drama world, the heroes are frequently scholarly types. Beautiful music, too, especially the ballad I’m Going to Meet You by Deok Hwan.
And if you’re wondering why the romance (and the frequent kissing – don’t miss a very cute one in episode 11) between the two leads seemed particularly convincing you should look at Ji Hyun Woo’s confession at the press conference and Yoo In Na’s response a week later. Excellent.
tvN. Written by Song Jae Jung.
2012 The Rooftop Prince
Rooftop Prince
The other fun time travel drama from 2012. A Joseon prince (Park Yoo Chun from Sungkyunkwan Scandal) and his three retainers are magically transported to contemporary Seoul on their quest to solve the murder of the princess. But the real story is about the prince and his missed chance for true love that – so we hope – might be realized through time travel. The romance is well developed while the crime investigation and the corporate politics move the plot forward with inventive twists and turns. And it’s great fun to watch the time travellers’ hilarious attempts to deal with modern life. Great acting all around. I could have done with more comedy and romance and less murder mystery. One caveat, though: the ending. It was a letdown. And a letdown so famous that by now it has become a well-known fear that haunts K-drama fans whenever a drama might turn into that direction: “Oh please, no, not another Rooftop Prince ending.” Excellent/Good.
SBS. Written by Lee Hee Myung.

BALLAD (IN KOREAN)

Starting Now, I Love You
Lee Seung Gi

POP SONG (IN ENGLISH)

Gotta Get Back to You
The Crystalairs

2011
2011 Boku to Star no 99 Nichi
Boku to Star no 99 Nichi / 99 Days with the Superstar
This is a Japanese drama with a Korean lead actress. Pure fun. A full-blown romantic comedy that is preciously light without being superficial. No melodramatic angst anywhere. Kim Tae Hee (My Princess, Yong Pal) is great as usual, playing a Korean filmstar making a movie in Japan. The real surprise is the wonderful Hidetoshi Nishijima as her bumbly, romantically clueless but insightful bodyguard. Excellent.
Fuji tv. Written by Takeda Yuki. Japanese Drama.
2011 Flower Boy Ramen Shop
Flower Boy Ramen Shop
The drama of the most almost-kisses and a heroine with serious digestive issues. Silly and lots of fun with the classic plot of a spoiled heir (Jung Il Woo as a high school kid) falling for the quirky heroine, a student teacher played by Lee Chung Ah. It’s not a high school drama, though – most of the show centers around a ramen restaurant. A pleasant palate cleanser of very light entertainment especially welcomed after watching several emotionally exhausting and heartrending dramas in a row. Nothing special but nice enough to watch. Good.
tvN. Written by Yoon Nan Joong.
2011 49 Days
49 Days
Genre alert! If you’d like to try out a melodrama, this one is a good choice. It has all the existential depth you expect from a melo but it also deals with some interesting spiritual questions, all wrapped in a fantasy story: A woman tries to commit suicide but by accident she causes the death of Shin Ji Hyun instead. As Ji Hyun’s time wasn’t up yet, a very handsome angel of death (Jung Il Woo from My Fair Lady and Flower Boy Ramen Shop) offers her a second chance if she can find three people outside of her family who really loved her.
You might need a box of Kleenex nearby. The title refers to the idea in Korean shamanism that after death the soul wanders the Earth for 49 days before moving on. Good or bad ending? Well, for sure, it’s a highly debated one.
SBS. Written by So Hyun Kyung.
D2011 Heartstrings
Heartstrings
If you’ve just been through one of those heart-wrenching dramas, this one will help you recover your emotional balance. Nothing too upsetting, perfectly pleasant, sometimes a bit boring (esp. the slow episodes 5 and 6 with too much singing and too many flashbacks) but still all and all a good drama to watch.
Park Shin Hye and Jung Yong Hwa play two students at a performing arts school. He is the hottest guy at school and a guitarist in a rock band, she’s the wallflower studying traditional Korean music and both get involved with staging a musical.
A nice band-aid for the fans of You’re Beautiful who were disappointed that Jung Yong Hwa didn’t get the girl. So here’s their chance to see him paired with Park Shin Hye. Good.
MBC. Written by Lee Myung Sook.
2011 Lie to Me
Lie to Me
The drama with Yoon Eun Hye’s favorite screen kiss (just be on the lookout for a coke bottle). Especially in the beginning it reminds me of an American screwball comedy. The actress plays an administrator working for the government’s tourist board – a congenial set-up for YEH as she holds a degree in Tourism Management. A bizarre misunderstanding leads to the rumor that she is engaged to a well-known super-rich CEO of a hotel group (Kang Ji Hwan). Great chemistry between two leads. The writer milks that crazy set-up for all the fun it’s worth so the first half of the drama is hugely enjoyable. Later on, it drags a bit. The lead-up to the ending is one of those typical Korean drama tropes but the ending itself is perfectly fine. Nice OST with an outstanding song by M to M (This is Really Good-bye). Excellent (the first half) / Good (the second half).
SBS. Written by Kim Ye Ri.
2011 The Greatest Love
The Greatest Love
In many dramas one of the leads works in the film or music industry, providing us with some insights into the world of actors and musicians. As a non-Korean viewer I’ve been always intrigued and baffled by some aspects of this business in Korea – like regular fan meetings, the existence of antifans or the ever-looming threat of scandals. In this drama the entertainment world is not just the background, it takes center stage. The main conflict focuses on the hierarchy of popularity and the obsession with the right image: We have the bottom dwellers like the female lead, Ae Jung (Gong Hyo Jin), who used to be a singer in a girls group. Her image has been tainted by a scandal and she’s trying desperately to use her former fame to survive. And then there are the top stars, like Dokko Jin (Cha Seung Won), one of the nation’s most popular actors. Could anything happen between them in a world ruled by PR and business interests?
While often amusing, the drama didn’t quite grab me. Maybe it was the leads or maybe the script didn’t quite sparkle as others by the Hong Sisters. Still perfectly agreeable. Good.
MBC. Written by Hong Mi Ran and Hong Jung Eun.
2010
2010 Becoming a Billionaire
Becoming a Billionaire
A hotel employee (Ji Hyun Woo) believes himself to be a member of a chaebol family and is desperately looking for his rich father. The series is perfectly pleasant but loses steam after the first third. Cutting the series from 20 to 16 episodes would have helped a lot. Still – nothing upsetting or completely boring, generally entertaining, with a pleasant (here is this word again) hero and heroine. That sounds like rather faint praise but considering the many bad dramas out there it still makes it on this list. Good.
KBS. Written by Choi Min Ki.
2010 My Girlfriend is a Gumiho
My Girlfriend is a Gumiho
Shin Min Ah and Lee Seung Gi make a cute couple in this comedic take on the Korean myth of the Gumiho, a usually scary nine-tailed fox who likes nothing better than to eat liver … human liver that is. Here the Gumiho takes on the form of Shin Min Ah (good choice) and is more interested in becoming human and eating cow (not necessarily in that order). The heartbreaking innocence and naivity of the Gumiho is beautifully portrayed by Shin Min Ah, mirroring nicely the depravity of the scheming humans around her. Lee Seung Gi plays to type, an immature jerk who in the end rises to the challenge of becoming a romantic hero. There’s an evil girl who gets off too lightly but also some much appreciated comic relief (Sung Dong-il and Yoon Yoo-sun). Excellent.
SBS. Written by Hong Mi Ran and Hong Jung Eun.
2010 Oh! My Lady
Oh! My Lady
More details soon. Excellent.
SBS. Written by Goo Sun Young.
2010 Playful Kiss
Playful Kiss
If you want to try out a high school drama, start with this one. Usually, I avoid them because I find all the bullying too unpleasant to watch – but in this one the mobbing is negligible. It’s the classic tale of an ugly duckling falling for the cutest guy in school. And it’s so refreshing to see that this drama avoids the cliche of the poor girl attracted to the rich guy (Hello, Boys Over Flowers!). Instead the hero’s outstanding quality is his intelligence. That he is also arrogant and lacking in emotional maturity and is therefore in need of a warm person like Oh Ha Ni (Jung So Min) is perfectly obvious to her (and to us).
The trials and tribulations and the sheer tenacity of Oh Ha Ni will pull on your heartstrings. Cute, amusing and very romantic. Excellent.
MBC. Written by Go Eun Nim.
2010 Secret Garden
Secret Garden
Who would have thought that sit-ups could be sooo romantic? Okay, I’ll be up front about it: This is my all-time favorite drama. It has the classic K-drama plot, perfectly and creatively executed: An arrogant and socially inept son of a super rich chaebol family (Hyun Bin as a department store CEO) falls for a poor but spunky heroine (Ha Ji Won as a stunt woman). It’s exquisitely written: The characters are well drawn, the actors inhabit their parts enthusiastically, the lead characters’ attraction is convincing, and even the secondary couple’s story is interesting and provides a diverting backdrop. But what really shines is the beautifully structured plot, which includes a few real surprises. A very engaging drama that draws the viewer in and switches between funny and dramatic and moving. Add to this a superb soundtrack featuring the song That Woman (sung by Baek Ji Young), certainly one of the best Korean ballads ever recorded.
The drama became so popular that it’s a pop-culture touchstone, and is frequently referenced in other dramas. For example, a dream sequence in Flower Boy Ramen Shop shows the hero wearing the same ridiculous sparkly blue tracksuit Hyun Bin’s character wears so proudly in Secret Garden. A more subtle allusion occurs in The King 2 Hearts when Ha Ji Won’s responds enthusiastically to a poster of Hyun Bin. Excellent.
SBS. Written by Kim Eun Sook. 2010-2011.
2010 Sungkyunkwan Scandal
Sungkyunkwan Scandal
If you’ve already got a taste of the Joseon drama world in the cross-over romances My Love from Another Star, Queen In Hyun’s Man or Rooftop Prince and want to explore the historicals a little bit more, try this one.
Park Min Young has never been cuter than in this historical gender-bender romance with Rooftop Prince Park Yoo Chun. She is trying to survive at an elite university disguised as a boy during the early Joseon era (I’m guessing 16th or 17th century?) If she were to be found out, her life would be at risk. Luckily, her three handsome friends are ready to protect and defend her. Though marked as a comedy, there’s quite a bit of suspense and some tension. Excellent.
KBS. Written by Kim Tae Hee.

BALLAD (IN KOREAN)

I’m Going to Meet You
Deok Hwan

POP SONG (IN ENGLISH)

Kiss Me
Sixpence None the Richer

2009
2009 Boys over Flowers
Boys over Flowers
Four rich kids control the social life at an elite Korean high-school. A feisty girl from the lower classes enters the fray. Add an evil manipulative mother and the drama is complete.
Boys over Flowers started out as a Japanese manga in the early 1990s and turned into one of the most popular manga in Japan with more than 50 million copies sold. This Korean TV version was also immensely successful, probably mostly due to the story line and the exquisitely clothed and very handsome quartet. This is a drama that is clearly targeted to teenage girls. If that’s you, go for it. I bet you’ll love it. For the rest of us, mmh, watching at least parts of it will be … educational. Kat from the Dramabeans forum puts it like this: “Yes, it was ridiculous and yes, it was bad but I could not stop watching.” Recommended (because it’s a classic) with reservations (because it’s a mess). Good.
KBS. Written by Yoon Ji Ryun.
2009 Billiant Legacy - Shining Inheritance
Brilliant Legacy
This very popular drama features Lee Seung Gi’s breakout performance, playing an arrogant heir whose inheritance is suddenly at risk. It’s very good in a lot of ways so it was originally one of my faves. But when I started watching it a second time, the evil stepmother really got on my nerves – she ruined it for me. If you think you can handle her, definitely give it a shot. Hugely popular in Korea and, with 28 episodes, extraordinarily long. Good.
SBS. Written by So Hyun Kyung.
2009 He Who Can't Marry copy
He Who Can’t Get Married
What makes a person a social outcast? Well, that depends on what kind of society you live in. A case in point is the hero in this remake of the Japanese show Kekkon Dekinai Otoko (2006). The character of Jo Jae Hee (Ji Jin Hee), a 40-year-old, unmarried architect in Seoul, is clearly inspired by the main character of the American hit comedy As Good As It Gets – Jack Nicholson gets even name-checked in one of the earlier episodes. Both are supposed to be social outcasts but because of their particular cultural contexts, the characters are quite different. Nicholson plays a character that is drawn in a much harsher light to make him stand out in the highly individualistic American culture. His debilitating case of OCD (he can’t step on cracks in the sidewalk, brings his own silverware to a restaurant, etc.) suggests that his constant and outrageous rudeness might even be part of his mental illness. Jo Jae Hee, on the other hand, is portrayed as an outsider mainly because he likes to be by himself outside of work: He avoids spending time with other people, even with his family, and much prefers to stay home by himself, eat a good meal and listen to classical music. While in an American context, he might be seen simply as a slightly eccentric individual focused very much on his work, his unsocial behavior makes him stand out in Korea. And, of course, he doesn’t want to get married because he enjoys his solitude. That is … until a 40-year-old, unmarried female doctor enters his life.
It’s certainly funny to watch how Jo Jae Hee keeps clashing with social expectations around him and see the social pressure to get married at work. But aside from the hero’s curious personality, there’s really not much new or interesting here. A pleasant rom-com, no hidden angst anywhere. Good.
KBS. Written by Yeo Ji Na.
2009 My Fair Lady
My Fair Lady
I really like Yoon Eun Hye’s work up to 2011 and this drama is no exception. Especially considering that YEH’s co-stars are Yoon Sang Hyun (Oska from Secret Garden) and super-handsome Jung Il Woo (49 Days, Flower Boy Ramen Shop). Yes, it’s love-triangle time again but this one actually works quite well (even though usually I really don’t like them).
Basically, this is a reversal of the classic Korean rom-com set-up: Here the girl is rich and belongs to the upper class and the guy is just scraping by. Yoon Eun Hye plays a spoiled and spunky heiress who gets entangled with debt-ridden Yoon Sang Hyun but is also wooed by Robin-Hood lawyer Jung Il Woo. Lots of slapstick comedy and a bubbly YEH. Excellent.
KBS. Written by Kim Eun Hee and Yoon Eun Kyung.
2009 That Fool - The Accidental Couple
That Fool / The Accidental Marriage
A drama with a very different kind of hero. Naive, insecure but super-nice postal worker Gu Dong Baek (played by Hwang Jung Min) gets by accident (literally) entangled with a popular movie star, rich and beautiful Han Ji Soo (Kim Ah Joong). That the postal worker is bowled over by the actress is easy to understand but is it really possible that Han Ji Soo could fall for this simple character?
It might take a few episodes but Gu Dong Baek will slowly grow on you. His unselfishness and amiability mark him as a fool (hence the title – which might also give a nod to Dostoevsky’s novel The Idiot) in a corrupt world where everybody follows their egoistic interest and everything can be bought. But luckily the story takes place in rom-com territory so in the end loyalty and kindness win the day. It’s a modern retelling of the classic tale of a (social) pauper who wins the princess through the purity of his heart.
It’s difficult to find any fault with this rom-com. The plot is generally well-thought out and moves steadily ahead – no annoying repeats going over the same ground – and with only a few minor stumbles. Most importantly, every twist and turn makes sense emotionally. The office scenes are often hilarious (due to two of my favorite supporting actors, Kim Kwang Kyu and Yoon Joo Sang), making fun of its hierarchical system and exposing social hypocrisy. Amusing side characters like Han Ji Soo’s temperamental brother or Gu Dong Baek’s highly dramatic sister add to the fun. And the leads are a pleasure to watch.
Two bonus points: one for the OST’s Korean version of Hirahara Ayaka’s beautiful ballad Kansha and the other one for the ending – simply perfect, especially considering how rom-com K-dramas sometimes undermine the whole story by having the most abstruse endings imaginable. Excellent.
KBS. Written by Jung Jin Young and Kim Eui Chan.
2009 You're Beautiful
You’re Beautiful
A girl pretends to be a boy and becomes a member of a boy group. This drama is just right for the teenage audience (or the teenager in you): Three hot guys, an adorable Park Shin Hye and lots of shenanigans and complications make for a fun viewing experience. As girlfriday from Dramabeans writes: “I never knew I wanted to be a cross-dressing girl/boy in an idol band…until this drama.” Tip: Watch for the fireworks scene. Pretty cute. Good.
SBS. Written by Hong Mi Ran and Hong Jung Eun.
2008
2008 Who Are You
Who are You?
A supernatural romantic drama with a promising set-up: A clumsy delivery man with loan sharks on his trail dies in a traffic accident and leaves a teenage daughter behind. He returns as a ghost and possesses a stranger for a few hours every day to help his daughter deal with his accident. But was it even an accident? Or was it murder?
This is certainly a drama of emotional extremes. It bounces back and forth from slapstick comedy to melodrama, with a murder mystery right smack in the middle. But that’s just the surface. In the end it’s a story about romance and parental love. Kang Nam Gil is great in his role as the wacky father/ghost, Yoon Kye Sang can shine as the apparently schizophrenic businessman, switching between a cold-hearted character with OCD behaviorisms and over-the-top craziness when possessed by the delivery man. Even Yoon Joo Sang is funny as the permanently grumpy angel of death. And Go Ara as the teenage daughter is simply stunning. So we have a great cast, an inventive premise and quite a few funny scenes. But the show feels bumpy and jarring in the beginning, gets better toward the middle but then falls into the common trap of K-dramas to draw out and replay the main conflicts for too long while the plot hardly advances. Then, in the last few episodes it suddenly runs smoothly again with a very nice ending. What it really needs is some good editing. An excellent drama is hiding in there and often it shines through.
There are several Korean shows with this title, so make sure you’re watching the 2008 version. Good (with flashes of excellence).
MBC. Written by Bae Yoo Mi.
2007
2007 Coffee Prince
Coffee Prince
There is a rawness to this show that almost gives it an indie feel. The plot was revolutionary at the time: A girl (Yoon Eun Hye) disguises herself as a boy to get a job at a cafe with all-male personnel. Her heterosexual boss (Gong Yoo) falls in love with her. He thinks she’s a man and he’s freaking out because he worries that he’s turning gay. The show’s huge success started a short-lived fashion of crossdressing girls in K-dramas (like You’re Beautiful (2009) and Sungkyunkwan Scandal (2010)). Lots of wacky side-characters add to the fun. Excellent.
MBC. Written by Lee Jung Ah and Jang Hyun Joo.
2006
2006 Couple or Trouble - Fantastic Couple
Couple or Trouble
A hilarious screwball comedy about a spoiled and bossy heiress who suffers from amnesia and is housed by a plumber. As payback for her misdeeds, he plans to make her work as a housemaid and nanny for a few months. Of course, this ludicrous revenge plot badly backfires and they both stumble from one scrape to another.
Han Ye Seul owns this drama with her portrayal of a heroine who’s full of pluck, opinionated and arrogant but still likable. Cute kids, an even cuter dog and bizarre side characters like Kang Ja (played by Jung Soo Young) round off this over the top rom-com. Excellent.
MBC. Written by Hong Mi Ran and Hong Jung Eun.
2006 Princess Hours
Princess Hours
Genre alert! A more melodramatic than rom-com-ish show about a commoner who agrees to an arranged marriage to the Korean crown prince. (The series unfolds in an alternate modern Korea that has retained its monarchy.) This is Yoon Eun Hye’s breakout role. There are a couple of funny scenes and Yoon Eun-Hye is cute but the tortured emotional entanglements weigh heavily. Good.
MBC. Written by In Eun A.
2005
2005 My Girl
My Girl
Starting out with a refreshing comedic lightness without being superficial, it becomes heavier later on. Another over-the-top comedy written by the Hong sisters. The center of this drama is Lee Da Hae as a con artist, hired to play the long-missing granddaughter of a hotelier’s grandfather. Good.
SBS. Written by Hong Mi Ran and Hong Jung Eun. 2005-2006.
2005 My Name is Kim Sam-soon small copy
My Name is Kim Sam Soon
The Korean version of Bridget Jones’s Diary. Our heroine (Kim Sun Ah) is an outspoken, overweight talented pastry chef, facing the third decade of her life – without being married. So the clock is ticking and the pressure is on. Enter our other protagonist, French restaurant owner Hyun Jin Heon, who decides to hire her. He is played by super-dreamy Hyun Bin (Secret Garden) and clearly way out of reach for our chubby pastry chef. Lots of fun to watch how they do end up together. A classic and a huge success in Korea – the last episode had 50 percent of all TV viewers tuned in. Excellent.
MBC. Written by Kim Do Woo. 2005

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